Forget just what to write; learn how in this series. We give you the know-hows of academic, professional, and casual English, guiding you towards flawless expression and precise use of language.

How to Use the Phrase "Do You Available?" or "Are You Available?"

The correct phrase is "are you available?" as it follows the standard subject-verb agreement. "Do you available?" is grammatically incorrect and should be avoided in professional communication.

How to Abbreviate Chinese?

For informal occasions, "Chin." is an acronym for Chinese. For international events and formal occasions, Chinese is the abbreviated as CN.

How to Use Baptized or Baptised in a Sentence

Which is correct, baptized or baptised? Both spellings are correct! "Baptized" is more common in American English, while "baptised" is more common in British English.

How to Use Scared or Scarred in a Sentence

"Scared" is an adjective that describes the feeling of fear or being frightened. "Scarred" is an adjective that describes the presence of scars, which are marks left on the skin or other tissue after a wound has healed.

How to Use Armor or Armour in a Sentence

Which is correct, armor or armour? Both spellings are correct! "Armor" is the American English spelling, while "armour" is the British English spelling.

How to Use Waver or Waiver in a Sentence

"Waver" means to hesitate, show indecision, or fluctuate in one's opinions, beliefs, or decisions. A "waiver" is an intentional and formal relinquishment of a right, claim, or privilege. It is often granted or obtained through written documentation.

How to Use Spoilt or Spoiled in a Sentence

Which is correct, spoilt or spoiled? Both spellings are correct! "Spoiled" is more common in American English, while "spoilt" is more common in British English.

How to Use Complement vs. Supplement in a Sentence

As a noun, "complement" refers to something that completes or goes well with another, enhancing or perfecting its qualities. As a verb, "complement" means to go well with or enhance the qualities of something else.

How to Use Summary or Summery in a Sentence

Summary is a noun referring to a concise version of a text or event, while summery is an adjective describing things related to summer. The two words share similar pronunciation, but mean very different things.